Oscar Actors: Baldwin, Alec–Background, Career, Awards (Cum Advantage; Tony Nom; Emmys; SAG Awards)

Updated July 13, 2020
Alec Baldwin Career Summary:

Occupational Inheritance:

Social Class:

Race/Ethnicity/Religion

Family: all 4 siblings are actors

Education: NYU

Training: Strasberg Actors Studio

Teacher/Inspirational Figure:

Radio Debut:

TV Debut: 1980-1982; age 22-24; then Knots Landing

Stage Debut:

Broadway Debut: Loot, 1986; age 28

Film Debut:

Breakthrough Role:

Oscar Role: The Cooler, 2003; age 45

Other Noms:

Other Awards: Tony Nom Best Actor; Streetcar Named Desire, 1992; age 34

Frequent Collaborator: Woody Allen

Screen Image: character actor

Last Film:

Career Output:

Film Career Span:

Marriage:

Politics:

Death:

Alexander Rae Baldwin III (born April 3, 1958) is an American actor, writer, producer, comedian, and political activist. A member of the Baldwin family, he is the eldest of the four Baldwin brothers, all actors. Baldwin first gained recognition appearing on seasons six and seven of the CBS television drama “Knots Landing.”

In his early career he played both leading and supporting roles in Tim Burton’s Beetlejuice (1988), Mike Nichols’ Working Girl (1988), Jonathan Demme’s Married to the Mob (1988), and Oliver Stone’s Talk Radio (1988).

He gained attention for his performances in as Jack Ryan in The Hunt for Red October (1990) and in Glengarry Glen Ross (1992). Since then he has worked with such notable directors as Woody Allen in Alice (1990), To Rome with Love (2012) and Blue Jasmine (2013), and Martin Scorsese in The Aviator (2004) and The Departed (2006).

His performance in the crime drama The Cooler (2003) garnered him a nomination for the Best Supporting Actor Oscar.

He has done voice work for The SpongeBob Squarepants Movie (2004), Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa (2008), Rise of the Guardians (2012), and The Boss Baby (2017).

From 2006 to 2013, Baldwin gained critical acclaim starring alongside Tina Fey as Jack Donaghy on the NBC sitcom 30 Rock, winning two Primetime Emmy Awards, three Golden Globe Awards, and seven Screen Actors Guild Awards for his work on the series, making him the male performer with the most SAG Awards history.

On stage, he portrayed Stanley Kowalski in the 1992 Broadway production of A Streetcar Named Desire and the title character in a 1998 Off-Broadway production of Macbeth, the former earning him a Tony Award nomination. Baldwin co-starred in Mission: Impossible–Rogue Nation (2015) and Mission: Impossible – Fallout (2018), the fifth and sixth installments of the Mission: Impossible series.

He is also a columnist for The Huffington Post. Since 2016, he has been the host of Match Game.

He has received attention and acclaim for his portrayal of Donald Trump on the long-running sketch series Saturday Night Live, both during the latter part of the 2016 U.S. presidential election campaign and after the inauguration, a role that won him third Primetime Emmy in 2017. He was nominated again in 2018.

Baldwin was born April 3, 1958, in Amityville, New York, and raised in the Nassau Shores neighborhood of nearby Massapequa, the eldest son of Carol Newcomb (née Martineau; born December 15, 1929) from Syracuse and Alexander Rae Baldwin Jr. (October 26, 1927 – April 15, 1983), a high school history/social studies teacher and football coach from Brooklyn.

He has three younger brothers, Daniel (born 1960), William (born 1963), and Stephen (born 1966), who also became actors. He also has two sisters, Elizabeth “Beth” Baldwin Keuchler (born 1955) and Jane Ann Baldwin Sasso (born 1965).

Alec and his siblings were raised as Roman Catholics. They are of Irish, French, and English ancestry. Through his father, Baldwin is descended from Mayflower passenger John Howland, and through this line, is the 13th generation of his family born in North America and the 14th generation to live in North America.

Baldwin attended Alfred G. Berner High School in Massapequa and played football there under Coach Bob Reifsnyder. In New York, Baldwin worked as a busboy at the disco Studio 54. From 1976 to 1979, he attended George Washington University. In 1979, he lost the election for student body president and received a personal letter from former U.S. president Richard Nixon (with whom he had a common friend) encouraging him to use the loss as a learning experience.

Afterward, he transferred to New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts where he studied with Geoffrey Horne and Mira Rostova at the Lee Strasberg Theatre Institute. Later, he was accepted as a member of the Actors Studio. In 1994, he completed his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree at NYU.

Baldwin made his Broadway debut in 1986 in a revival of Joe Orton’s Loot alongside Zoë Wanamaker, Željko Ivanek, Joseph Maher, and Charles Keating.[22] This production closed after three months. His other Broadway credits include Caryl Churchill’s Serious Money with Kate Nelligan and a revival of Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire, for which his performance as Stanley Kowalski garnered a Tony Award nomination for Best Actor. Baldwin also received an Emmy nomination for the 1995 TV version of the production, in which both he and Jessica Lange reprised their roles, alongside John Goodman and Diane Lane.

In 1998 Baldwin played the title role in Macbeth at The Public Theater alongside Angela Bassett and Liev Schreiber in a production directed by George C. Wolfe.

In 2004 Baldwin starred in a revival of Broadway’s Twentieth Century about a successful and egomaniacal Broadway director (Baldwin), who has transformed a chorus girl (Anne Heche) into a leading lady.

On June 9, 2005, he appeared in a concert version of the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical South Pacific at Carnegie Hall. He starred as Luther Billis, alongside Reba McEntire as Nellie and Brian Stokes Mitchell as Emile. The production was taped and telecast by PBS on April 26, 2006. In 2006 Baldwin made theater news in Roundabout Theatre Company’s Off-Broadway revival of Joe Orton’s Entertaining Mr. Sloane.

In 2010, Baldwin starred opposite Sam Underwood in a critically acclaimed revival of Peter Shaffer’s Equus, directed by Tony Walton at Guild Hall in East Hampton, New York.

Baldwin returned to Broadway as Harold in Orphans. The show, which opened April 18, 2013, was also to have starred Shia LaBeouf as Treat, but LaBeouf left the production in rehearsals and was replaced by Ben Foster.

Baldwin’s first acting role was as Billy Aldrich in the NBC daytime soap opera The Doctors from 1980 to 1982. In fall 1983, he starred in the short-lived television series Cutter to Houston. He went on to appear as the brother of Valene Ewing and son of Lilimae Clements (played by Joan Van Ark and Julie Harris, respectively) in Knots Landing from 1984 to 1985. In 1986 Baldwin starred in Dress Gray, a four-hour made-for-television miniseries, as an honest cadet sergeant who tries to solve the mystery of a murdered gay classmate.[28] In 1998 he became the third narrator and George Carlin’s replacement for the fifth and sixth seasons of Thomas & Friends. In 2000 he starred in “Thomas and the Magic Railroad” as Mr Conductor. He left the show in 2002 on winning the role of Lawrence Quinn in The Cat in the Hat and was replaced by Michael Brandon.

In 2002 Baldwin appeared in two episodes of Friends as Phoebe’s overly enthusiastic love interest, Parker. He also portrayed a recurring character in a number of season 7 and 8 episodes of Will & Grace, in which he played Malcolm, a “top secret agent” and the lover of Karen Walker (Megan Mullally). He also guest-starred in the first live episode of the series. Baldwin wrote an episode of Law & Order entitled “Tabloid”, which aired in 1998. He played Dr. Barrett Moore, a retired plastic surgeon, in the series Nip/Tuck. He starred as Jack Donaghy on NBC’s 30 Rock, which first aired October 2006. He met his future co-stars Tina Fey and Tracy Morgan while appearing on Saturday Night Live, and is one of only two actors to whom Lorne Michaels has extended a standing offer to host the show should their schedules permit (the other being Christopher Walken). Since season 3, Baldwin was credited as one of 30 Rock’s producers.

Baldwin has won three Emmy Awards, two Golden Globe awards and seven Screen Actors Guild Awards for his role. He received his second Emmy nomination for Best Actor in TV Comedy or Musical as Jack Donaghy in 2008, marking his seventh Primetime Emmy nomination and first win. He won again in 2009.

Baldwin joined TCM’s The Essentials Robert Osborne as co-host beginning in March 2009.  In 2009, he appeared in a series of commercials for Hulu that premiered during the Super Bowl broadcast.

In 2010, he made a five-second cameo appearance with comedian Andy Samberg in a musical video titled “Great Day” featured on the bonus DVD as part of Lonely Island’s album Turtleneck & Chain.

Baldwin co-hosted the 82nd Oscar Awards with Steve Martin in 2010. He has hosted Saturday Night Live 17 times as of February 11, 2017, and holds the record for most times hosting the show.[35] He also impersonated Republican nominee Donald Trump during SNL’s coverage of the 2016 Presidential election, to critical acclaim. In 2017, he won a Primetime Emmy for his portrayal of Trump.

Beginning in 2010, Baldwin appeared in a television campaign for Capital One as their spokesperson.  After his 2013 confrontation with a videographer reported by TMZ, his contract was not renewed, and he was succeeded in the campaign by Jennifer Garner.

On February 4, 2012, he hosted the 2011 NFL Honors awards show. He later hosted the second show on February 2, 2013.

In 2013 Baldwin briefly hosted Up Late with Alec Baldwin on MSNBC. On November 26, 2013, the program was cancelled after only five episodes, due in part to a street tirade captured on video. TMZ claimed Baldwin’s insult toward the videographer was “cocksucking fag.” Baldwin, who denied that he used the word “fag,” later cited this incident as a major turning point in his public life.

In 2016 Baldwin began hosting a reboot of the game show Match Game on ABC. In 2017, he took over as sole host of TCM’s The Essentials following the death of his co-host, Robert Osborne.

On March 3, 2018, following the broadcast of the 90th Academy Awards, ABC broadcast a preview episode of the talk show The Alec Baldwin Show, at the time called Sundays With Alec Baldwin, scheduled to formally debut with a nine-episode order that fall.

Baldwin is next set to star opposite Jamie Dornan and Christian Slater in Dr. Death set to premiere on Peacock.

Film

Baldwin in 2012
Baldwin made his film debut with a minor role in the 1987 film Forever, Lulu. In 1988, he appeared in Beetlejuice and Working Girl. He gained further recognition as a leading man with his role as Jack Ryan in The Hunt for Red October (1990).

Baldwin met his future wife Kim Basinger when they played lovers in the 1991 film The Marrying Man. Next, Baldwin played a ferocious sales executive in Glengarry Glen Ross (1992), a part added to the film version of David Mamet’s Pulitzer Prize-winning stage play (including the monologue “Coffee’s for closers”).

Later that same year, he starred in Prelude to a Kiss with Meg Ryan, which was based on the Broadway play. The film received a lukewarm reception by critics and grossed only $22 million worldwide.[51] He appeared with Basinger again in The Getaway, a 1994 remake of the 1972 Steve McQueen film of the same name.

Also, in 1994, Baldwin made a foray into pulp fiction-based movies with the role of the title character in The Shadow. The film made $48 million. In 1996 and 1997 he continued to work in several thrillers, including The Edge, The Juror, and Heaven’s Prisoners.

Baldwin shifted towards character acting, beginning with Pearl Harbor in 2001. He played Lt. Col. James Doolittle in the film. With a worldwide box office of $449,220,945, this film remains the highest-grossing film Baldwin has appeared in during his acting career.[52] Baldwin was nominated for an Academy Award, a Golden Globe, and the Screen Actors Guild Award for his performance in the 2003 gambling drama The Cooler.[10]

He appeared in Martin Scorsese’s The Aviator (2004) and The Departed (2006).[10] In 2006, he starred in the film Mini’s First Time. He performed opposite Sarah Michelle Gellar in Suburban Girl (2007). Two years later, he co-starred in the hit romantic comedy It’s Complicated with Meryl Streep and Steve Martin.

Baldwin directed and starred in The Devil and Daniel Webster with Anthony Hopkins, Jennifer Love Hewitt and Dan Aykroyd in 2001.[53] The then-unreleased film became an asset in a federal bank fraud trial when investor Jed Barron was convicted of bank fraud while the movie was in production. The film was eventually acquired by The Yari Group without Baldwin’s involvement.[54]

In 2007 the Yari Film Group announced that it would give the film, now titled Shortcut to Happiness, a theatrical release in the spring, and cable film network Starz! announced that it had acquired pay TV rights for the film. Shortcut to Happiness was finally released in 2008. Baldwin, displeased with the way the film had been cut in post-production, demanded that his directorial credit be changed to the pseudonym “Harry Kirkpatrick”.[55]

Baldwin co-starred in Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation, the fifth installment of the Mission: Impossible series, released on July 31, 2015, and reprised the role in Mission: Impossible – Fallout, released on July 27, 2018.[4]

On August 27, 2018, it was announced that Baldwin would join the cast for Joker, playing Thomas Wayne, father of Bruce Wayne.[56] Later, on August 29, 2018, Baldwin withdrew from the role.[57][58]

Radio and Podcasts
On January 12, 2009, Baldwin became the host of The New York Philharmonic This Week, the nationally syndicated radio series of the New York Philharmonic.[59] He has recorded two nationally distributed public service radio announcements on behalf of the Save the Manatee Club.[60]

On October 24, 2011, WNYC public radio released the first episode of Baldwin’s podcast Here’s the Thing, a series of interviews with public figures including artists, policy-makers, and performers. The first two episodes featured actor Michael Douglas and political consultant Ed Rollins.[61] Between 2011 and 2020, Baldwin completed more than 150 interviews, with guests who included musician Wynton Marsalis, filmmaker Edward Norton, comedian David Letterman, violinist Itzhak Perlman, pianist Lang Lang among many others.[62] Here’s the Thing was developed for Alec Baldwin by Lu Olkowski, Trey Kay, Kathy Russo, and Emily Botein.[63]

Books
Baldwin co-authored the book A Promise to Ourselves: A Journey Through Fatherhood and Divorce with Mark Tabb in 2008. His 2017 memoir Nevertheless debuted at #5 on the New York Times hardcover nonfiction best-seller list.[64]

Audiobooks
2017: Nevertheless: A Memoir (read by the author), HarperCollins Publishers and Blackstone Audio, ISBN 978-1-5384-3279-2
Philanthropy
Baldwin, along with his mother Carol, created the Carol M. Baldwin Cancer Research Fund. This led to the Carol M. Baldwin Breast Care Center at the Stony Brook University Hospital to be named in her honor.[65][66]

During his 2010–2013 stint as a spokesperson for Capital One, Baldwin’s contract was written to fund Baldwin’s charity foundation. He was paid $15 million over nearly five years. After taxes and accounting fees, the remainder, $14.125 million, was given to charity.[37]

In March 2011, Baldwin donated $1 million to the New York Philharmonic (on whose board he served), and $500,000 to the Roundabout Theatre Company, where he has performed plays in New York.[67] In recent years, his foundation has donated bookstore gift certificates to Long Island libraries to support literacy programs.[68]

Baldwin successfully barred SeaQuest Interactive Aquariums from constructing a petting zoo aquarium on Long Island in 2018.[69]

Filmography
Main article: Alec Baldwin filmography
Awards and nominations
Baldwin has also received a number of awards and nominations throughout his career for stage, television and film roles:

Academy Awards

Year Category Nominated work Result
2003 Best Supporting Actor The Cooler Nominated

Tony Awards

1992 Best Actor in a Play A Streetcar Named Desire Nominated