Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, The (1954): Luis Bunuel Directs Dan O’Herlihy in Oscar-Nominated Performance

Luis Bunuel directed and co-wrote (with Philip Roll) This superbly mounted film, a rather accurate adaptation of Daniel Defoe’s classic novel, “The Life and Strange Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe.”
It’s hard to think of a director who has had a more fertile and versatile career than Bunuel, whose impressive output had spanned half a century and included films made in Spain, Mexico, and France.
Bunuel considered “Robinson Crusoe” as a personal film, and indeed, he succeeds in conveying the isolation, loneliness, and alienation of a stranded survivor, whose transformation is both physical and mental, based on his new living conditions as well as his vague and fading memories of civilized society.
American actor Dan O’Herlihy gives a strong, Oscar-nominated performance in the title role, a sailor whose ship is wrecked in a storm and finds himself washed up on the shore of a desert island. All the other humans have been killed, save for a cat, a dog, and some weapons that Crusoe was able to salvage.
After two decades of solitary existence, living a most primitive life, a band of natives arrive. When they are about to kill one of their member, Crusoe intervenes and saves the guy.  For the next decade, Crusoe and Friday (Jaime Fernandez) develop a strong friendship—until Crusoe is rescued by a crew of a ship and is sent back to civilization, albeit as a different kind of man.
UA (Mexican production)
Oscar Nominations: 1
Actor: Dan O’Herlihy
Oscar Context
The winner of the Best Actor Oscar was Marlon Brando for “On the Waterfront,” which swept most of the awards in 1954, including Best Picture, Director (Kazan), and others.
Cast
Robinson Crusoe   (Dan O’Herlihy)
Friday (Jaime Fernandez)
Captain Oberzo (Felipe de Alba)
Bos’n (Chel Lopez)
Leaders of the Mutiny (Jose Chavez and Emilio Garibay)
Running Time: 90 Minutes