Oscar Movies: Lost Weekend, The (1945)

Billy Wilder's “The Lost Weekend,” which won the 1945 Best Picture Oscar, is an important film because it was the first major Hollywood movie about alcoholism. Prior to that, alcoholics in film were either comic or secondary characters, but never the protagonists.

Oscar Nominations: 7

Paramount

Picture, produced by Charles Brackett
Director: Billy Wilder
Actor: Ray Milland
Screenplay: Charles Brackett and Billy Wilder
Cinematography (b/w): John F. Seitz
Editing: Doane Harrison
Scoring (Dramatic or Comedy): Miklos Rozsa

Oscar Awards: 4

Picture
Director
Actor
Screenplay

Oscar Context

“The Lost Weekend” won over Hitchcock's suspense-thriller “Spellbound” and Leo McCarey's comedy “The Bells of St. Mary's,” both starring Ingrid Bergman. The other two nominees were the MGM musical “Anchors Aweigh” and Warner's noir melodrama “Mildred Pierce,” for which Joan Crawford won the Best Actress for a comeback performance.

The most nominated film was “The Bells of St. Mary's” (8), though it won only one award, for Stephen Dunn's Sound Recording, perhaps because it was a sequel to “Going My Way,” which swept most of the 1944 Oscars.

Ray Milland was one of the few actors to win the Oscar at his first nomination and not to be nominated again, despite giving many reliable performances.

Ace composer Miklos Rozsa, whose specialty was film noir, was nominated in 1945 for three Oscars. The other two were: “A Song to Remember,” on which he collaborated with Morris Stoloff, and “Hitchcock's “Spellbound,” for which he won.