Toronto Film Fest 2011: Where Do We Go Now–Most Popular Film

The loyal audiences of the 2011 Toronto Film Festival have voted Nadine Labaki’s “Where Do We Go Now?” as winner of the People’s Choice award — in recent years seen as a guarantee of awards-season glory.

The honor, handed out at the Sunday afternoon awards brunch, comes with a C$15,000 ($15,342) cash prize.

“Where Do We Go Now?”, about women from different religions who band together to protect their small community from violence, is co-written by Labaki (“Caramel”), who also co-stars, and was recently announced as Lebanon’s entry for foreign-language Oscar contention.

Asghar Faradi’s “A Separation” and Ken Scott’s “Starbuck” were voted, respectively, first and second runners-up by Toronto audiences.

Midnight Madness opener “The Raid,” Gareth Evans’ Indonesian martial arts actioner, won top kudos from the popular late-night program’s audiencess, who chose Adam Wingard’s “You’re Next” and Bobcat Goldthwait’s “God Bless America” as their first and second runners-up.

Jon Shenk’s feature documentary “The Island President,” about Maldives president Mohamed Nasheed’s battle for democracy, nabbed the People’s Choice docu award. Bess Kargman’s “First Position” was first runner-up, with Cameron Crowe’s “Pearl Jam Twenty” taking second runner-up position.

Toronto fest favorite Philippe Falardeau (“Congorama”) nabbed the jury-chosen Canadian Feature Film prize for “Monsieur Lazhar,” about a middle-aged Algerian immigrant seeking political refuge in Quebec. The prize comes with a cash prize of $30,684.

Nathan Morlando’s “Edwin Boyd,” starring Scott Speedman as a notorious real-life bank robber and dreamer, nabbed the jury-chosen best Canadian first feature prize and $15,342. The Canadian first feature jury gave a special citation to Anne Emond’s “Nuit #1.”

The six-member Fipresci international critics’ jury awarded its prize in the fest’s Special Presentations program to Gianni Amelio’s “The First Man,” based on an unfinished Algeria-set Albert Camus novel.

Swedish helmer Axel Petersen’s dark comedy “Avalon” won the Fipresci award for best Discovery program title

On Friday, the Toronto fest’s sales and industry office reported a 20% growth in delegate attendance year-on-year, with close to 4,000 registered buyers, sales agents, producers and filmmakers

The honor, handed out at the Sunday afternoon awards brunch, comes with a C$15,000 ($15,342) cash prize.

“Where Do We Go Now?”, about women from different religions who band together to protect their small community from violence, is co-written by Labaki (“Caramel”), who also co-stars, and was recently announced as Lebanon’s entry for foreign-language Oscar contention.

Asghar Faradi’s “A Separation” and Ken Scott’s “Starbuck” were voted, respectively, first and second runners-up by Toronto audiences.

Midnight Madness opener “The Raid,” Gareth Evans’ Indonesian martial arts actioner, won top kudos from the popular late-night program’s audiencess, who chose Adam Wingard’s “You’re Next” and Bobcat Goldthwait’s “God Bless America” as their first and second runners-up.

Jon Shenk’s feature documentary “The Island President,” about Maldives president Mohamed Nasheed’s battle for democracy, nabbed the People’s Choice docu award. Bess Kargman’s “First Position” was first runner-up, with Cameron Crowe’s “Pearl Jam Twenty” taking second runner-up position.

Toronto fest favorite Philippe Falardeau (“Congorama”) nabbed the jury-chosen Canadian Feature Film prize for “Monsieur Lazhar,” about a middle-aged Algerian immigrant seeking political refuge in Quebec. The prize comes with a cash prize of $30,684.

Nathan Morlando’s “Edwin Boyd,” starring Scott Speedman as a notorious real-life bank robber and dreamer, nabbed the jury-chosen best Canadian first feature prize and $15,342. The Canadian first feature jury gave a special citation to Anne Emond’s “Nuit #1.”

The six-member Fipresci international critics’ jury awarded its prize in the fest’s Special Presentations program to Gianni Amelio’s “The First Man,” based on an unfinished Algeria-set Albert Camus novel.

Swedish director Axel Petersen’s dark comedy “Avalon” won the Fipresci award for best Discovery program title.

On Friday, the Toronto fest’s sales and industry office reported a 20% growth in delegate attendance year-on-year, with close to 4,000 registered buyers, sales agents, producers and filmmakers