Film Theory: Unique Art Form–Why We Still Love Them?

Many critics and viewers have lamented the decline of movie love in the U.S., claiming that movies qua movies are no longer prominent or relevant as they used to be, that they are an art form of the twentieth century, not of the new millennium.

And yet, movie are a unique art form, offering a unique experience.

Here are some of the reasons:

Of all art forms and mediums of entertainment, it’s movies that can offer us the delirium of excess.

Movies still represent the most mysterious and the most sensual (and erotic) art form, even when our knowledge of what goes on behind the scenes keeps growing.

Movies, even mainstream Hollywood programmers, operate on many different levels and offer us many different ways to react to them, turning the act of watching into a very open and thrilling experience.

Pauline Kael has correctly observed that, “American movies are the best proof that Americans are at their liveliest and freest, when they  don’t take themselves seriously.”

Movie can be both pleasurable and dangerous, because they can affect us in many sensual, even primitive ways.

Watching a new movie, for which we had built anticipation (due to a variety of reasons), is like going on blind date, entering into a first adventure, with all the possible (or potential) fears, anxieties, terrors, and pleasures intact.