Peepli Live

India

“Peepli Live” is a warm, timely, often funny chronicle of today's rapidly modernizing India.
 
Written and directed by Anusha Rizvi, “Peepli Live” is produced by Aamir Khan (of the Oscar-nominated “Lagaan”), one of India's most popular actorswho is also an award-winning director and producer. It was the first Indian film ever shown in competition at the 2010 Sundance Film Festand later played at this year's Berlin Film Fest.
                                                                                                                      
After losing their land due to unpaid government loan, Natha and Budhia, two brothers and farmers residing in the heart of rural India, seek the help of a local politician. Not concerned with their plight, the politician mockingly suggests that the brothers commit suicide to benefit from a government scheme that aids the families of indebted farmers who have killed themselves.
 
Budhia, the shrewder of the two, encourages Natha, a simpleton by nature, to think of the greater good of their. Unfortunately, their drunken conversation in a bar is overheard by a journalist, and the next day it appears in a local newspaper under the header “A Death Foretold in Peepli Village.”
 
The article sparks a chain of unanticipated events, which reach the highest corridors of power in India’s political machinery. With soon coming elections, what would otherwise have been common fare turns into a ‘cause célèbre,’ with all kinds of people vying for a piece of the action. From the glitzy TV studios in New Delhi to the Agricultural Ministry, journalists, newsmen, local and national politicians descend upon the little village to stake their claim. 
 
The circus propagates itself and escalates to the point where nobody seems to care anymore about the fate of the poor farmer Natha.
 
In the end, “Peepli Live” becomes a poignant social satire, with strong elements of a hilarious screwball comedy, about contemporary Indian society, its rural foundations, its changing demographics, its red-tape bureaucracy, its multi-faced politics, and so on.